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Question ID: 620475

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  • Question ID: 620475

    Hello Tony,
    I don't fully agree with that.I know that the EFIS EHSI shows the time to the next waypoint, and that's the way to communicate, quote to ATC etc. But forgetting that I sit in a flight deck before and just reading this question " best information about the progress of a flight between 2 en-route waypoints" I would presume the best what was actually sure ATA, ATO. It says ETD (Estimated Time of Departure) is a future event, yes it is.But ETO (Estimated Time Overhead) is also a future event, closer though. ATA is used during flight for navigation point between. Not just for the "final destination"
    And it says :"An ATA (Actual Time of Arrival) is also a future event, estimated BEFORE the arrival takes place" which is wrong.Its not future and not estimated befor flight.
    I am overthinking again, am I not, instead of learning the point and getting out from here.






    Which of the following gives the best information about the progress of a flight between 2 en-route waypoints from a RNAV equipment?
    ETO
    Elapsed time on route.
    ETD
    ATA


    An ETD (Estimated Time of Departure) is a future event, estimated BEFORE the flight takes place. An ATA (Actual Time of Arrival) is also a future event, estimated BEFORE the arrival takes place. Elapsed Time en Route provides a good indication of progress along the whole route to that point in time. ETO (Estimated Time Overhead) is a term specifically used for Estimating Time of Arrival overhead an en-route Waypoint and would, therefore, be the best means of indicating progress between Waypoints.

  • #2
    Re: Question ID: 620475

    An Actual Time of Arrival (ATA) cannot be stated until the time of arrival has been reached. The same applies to Elapsed Time En-Route (ETE).

    An Estimated Time of Departure is an event in the future BEFORE any portion of the flight has taken place.

    The Estimated Time of Overflight (ETO) is an event in the future following the passing of the previous Actual Time of Departure (ATD) or Actual Time of Overflight (ATO) and may therefore be used to calculate the progress of the flight between the last event and the next event.

    Apart from the fact that I have never used nor ever come across anyone who has used or even heard the phrase 'ETO', this is a very petty question.

    Store it away for the exam!
    Best Regards,

    Tony Pike

    Give Sergei back his dignity......Simples!

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Question ID: 620475

      Tony,
      Thanks for all your time again, fair play.

      I totally understand all what your said and I have never hear this new phrase too.

      But what I was trying to say that there are flight logs and also the ATPL Flight Planning subject is full of tables showing especially fuel monitoring and calculation where the actual data used for everything at each waypoint is ATA. Actual time of arrival( not at destination) at waypoing, check point etc.
      So I say the best to use what I know for sure, ie time I logged 5 min ago overhead my checkpoint to estimate the next.

      Also was trying to say that this,just as you said("An Actual Time of Arrival (ATA) cannot be stated until the time of arrival has been reached")
      And this is in the explanation:
      An ATA (Actual Time of Arrival) is also a future event, estimated BEFORE the arrival takes place. the explanation is incorrect.
      Huhh a lot of stuff to get tangled up.
      Cheers

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Question ID: 620475

        An Actual Time of Arrival is a PAST event, stated after the event has occurred, an Estimated Time of Arrival is a FUTURE event, using forecast data to predict a time of arrival at a particualr point in space.

        I really wish we could bring Special Relativity into this, to make it really interesting.

        You be good out there!
        Best Regards,

        Tony Pike

        Give Sergei back his dignity......Simples!

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Question ID: 620475

          Well
          yes, no, maybe, I dont know.
          Probably I should just store the question away for exam and go away.
          Thanks for all your time and patience.

          Comment


          • #6
            Hi,
            The explanation on the BGS online question page for this Q still appears to be wrong (five years after this thread was written), can it be looked at again please as I consider it confusing. Maybe just add a line saying words to the effect of 'just store it away for the exam' as used above so time isn't spent on further research. Does BGS know if the question has been reported as used recently please?
            Thanks.

            Comment


            • #7
              Something simple has got over-complicated here. I'll draft an improved explanation for approval. Unfortunately, in all subjects, we're regularly surprised when questions we never expected to see again rise from the grave and are reported, unchanged, in the latest exams.

              Traditionally, pilots continually report ETOs when flying along airways "procedurally" in areas where there is no radar coverage, (which is still a high proportion of the globe). An oceanic crossing is a good example.

              Passing each waypoint, the pilot is required to report his time and Flight level at that waypoint and give an estimate of his time overhead the next (ETO). The controller can then check that there will be no confliction with other aircraft at that next waypoint. (If there is, the pilot might be asked to change his speed or flight level).

              There could be 40 minutes or much more between waypoints, so the pilot has to monitor his progress between waypoints to ensure that the ETO he gave remains accurate. This task is made easy by the read-out on the RNAV equipment referred to in this question.

              In some areas, an "ADS-B" equipped aircraft can now continually report its own GPS positions via satellite comms to the controller, The pilot has even less to do and will find it even harder to stay awake!

              Comment

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