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Q id: 320419

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  • Q id: 320419

    Hi again

    I might be going a bit mad but when I line up +30deg with 4000ft PA with a CAS of 100 on the old CRP-5, I get a TAS of 111, not 109 as is in the answer. As this question then wants you to find out the ground distance covered this speed is essential to get right. On my whizz wheel, to get 109kts the temp has to be 20deg at 4000ft.

    Sorry to make a fuss over 2kts 😂

  • #2
    I also get 111 kts !
    I'm away until 20 June so will look at it in more detail then.
    With all these questions be as accurate as you can.

    Comment


    • #3
      Hi

      I'm sitting perf on Monday, can anyone shed any light on this before then?! I have terrible luck so this q is likely to come up for me!!

      Is it an error on the question in the bank or is it more likely to be incorrect in the exam, if so I'll just remember the answer lol!

      Cheers
      Kat

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      • #4
        Hi Kat
        The result is not a lot different.
        The exact gradient can be found by using the formula Gradient = roc/Tas x 6000/6080
        The Roc can be found in the graph which is 980 fpm
        Gradient = 980/111 x 6000/6080 = 8.71% (rounded to 8.7)

        Still air distance = 1450/8.7 x 100 =16666 ft
        Ground distance = 16666 x 131/111 = 19669 ft.
        Close enough to the given answer.
        It's possible that in the last review by the CAA that it may have been amended.

        As I said before be as accurate as you can.

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        • #5
          Hi Colin

          Thanks, they must be after using that formula then.

          Cheers
          Kat

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          • #6
            Hello Colin,

            In this question, why is it that you do not take account of 150% of the TW?

            Is it because it's neither a take off, nor a landing or an Obstacle Domain situation?

            Thanks,

            Hierome

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            • #7
              It's just simply a ground distance calculation. If you had an obstacle to clear then you would factor the wind.

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              • #8
                Allright. I see.

                Thank you for that explanation,

                Hierome

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