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Gyro Erection

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  • Gyro Erection

    I don?t understand how the unbalanced exhaust air escaping from the vents when its tilted causes a precession on the rotor. I can imagine air coming in, being drawn over the gyro rotor turning it but I just don?t see how the exhaust arrangement causes a precession on the rotor itself since the vents are in the bottom of the casing. (I?m okay with the DI)
    Perhaps I am looking in too much depth at this aspect?

  • #2
    Re: Gyro Erection

    In the case of the DI the air with the gyro erect acts directly on the buckets. If the gyro however tilts a component of the air acts on the rim of the rotor and 90 degrees later in the direction of rotation a precessional force is applied and this erects the gyro so that it remains aligned with the vertical axis.

    In the case of the artificial horizon the air is ejected from the base of the gyro through the pendulocity unit. This has 4 vanes; 2 athwartships and 2 in the longitudinal plane. During take off the pendulocity unit is thrown backwards and this affects the athwartships vanes; one fully closes and one fully opens. The ones in the longitudinal axis remain half open and thus produce equal and opposirte reactions. The fully open vane ejects air and the effect of the air coming out produces an oppposing force. in the plane of rotation of the gyro a precession force is applied to the back of the pendulosity unit and erects the gyro as shown in your notes. This is shown as a climbing turn to the right on take-off.

    I hope this helps

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    • #3
      Re: Gyro Erection

      Thanks Kevin.

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      • #4
        Re: Gyro Erection

        The pendulocity vane unit at the base of the gyro unit has 4 knife edged pendulously suspended vanes clamped in pairs on two intersecting shafts. When the uinit is vertical equally uncover the ports with equal amounts of air being emitted from each placing the unit in equilibrium. During take-off the the vane on the left of the unit is fully uncovered and the one on the right fully closed. The two vanes in the longitudinal direction continue to remain half open. The reaction of the air being expelled from the left vane produces a torque reaction , which is equivalent to a force being applied to the top of the rotor rim above the left port. Since the rotor rotates anti-clockwise this results in a precessional force being applied 90 degrees later to the top of the rotor nearest the pilot, thus returning the gyro to its vertical position.

        I hope that this makes things clearer, but be assured that the questions do not go to this depth. You need to know what the unit does and that during take-off the instrument shows a climbing turn to the right.

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